Speakers

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George Coles

Senior Orthotist (MBAPO)

London Orthotic Consultancy

I qualified with a BSc (Hons) in Prosthetics and Orthotics from Salford University in 2015 with first-class honours. Prior to joining LOC in March 2019, I worked at Queen Mary’s hospital and King’s College hospital managing complex clinics including inpatients and outpatients. As soon as I joined LOC, I worked with Elaine Owen in our gait lab specialising in lower limb orthotics and gait analysis. I also specialised in musculoskeletal foot and ankle conditions, Scoliosis using asymmetric bracing solutions, adult/paediatric neurorehabilitation (including upper/lower limb) as well as orthotic treatment for the diabetic foot.

The Optimal Segmental Kinematic Alignment approach to Rehabilitation (OSKAR) with patients with cerebral palsy

One

Day:

17:00 - 17:30 GMT

The orthotic treatment for CP is a complex subject with very divisive opinions. Elaine while at Bangor pioneered the use of AFOs and the gait lab to treat children with neuro-disabilities. She then spent her life researching and training others to carry this on. Now working with her in LOC we have created the OSKAR clinic which uses her processes and techniques to create a clinical orthotic solution to the gait issues we see with CP. I will be going through our process and discussing using the OSKAR principles for treatment for patients with CP

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Dr. Nicky Eddison

Associate Professor in Orthotics

Staffordshire University

Nicky graduated as an orthotist in 2007, progressing to Senior Orthotist, Principal Orthotist and Orthotics Service Manager at the Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust. In 2021 Nicky became the first Consultant Orthotist in the history of the NHS. Alongside these clinical roles Nicky worked as a research assistant and then senior research fellow at Staffordshire university, becoming an Associate Professor in 2021.

Nicky is Chair of the Professional Affairs Committee for the British association of Prosthetists and Orthotists and sits on the Executive Committee, Operations Strategy Committee, and the Research committee. Her research interests include biomechanical optimisation of ankle foot orthoses, gait analysis, digitalisation in healthcare and health inequalities.

Standardised classification system for bespoke thermoplastic ankle foot orthoses (AFOs)

One

Day:

16:30 -17:00 GMT

The term “AFO” has been classified and standardised by the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO), however the different types of AFOs have yet to be standardised. This presentation will focus on a new classification system for bespoke thermoplastic AFOs. The classification has been validated via a consortium of 63 healthcare professionals across 13 countries.

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Paul Fotheringham

Founder | Technologist, Entrepreneur, and 3D Printing Expert

3D LifePrints (3DLP)

Paul Fotheringham is the founder of 3D LifePrints (3DLP) and is an experienced Technologist, Entrepreneur, and 3D printing expert who focuses on the medical sector. He holds a joint Bachelor of Science degree in Computer & Management Science from the University of Edinburgh. After graduating, he worked in over 10 countries including the US, UK, HK, Japan, and South Korea as an Enterprise Architect for organizations such as the London Stock Exchange, British Petroleum, Accenture, and Macquarie Group. In 2012 he took up a post as Chief Technology Officer for a global Micro-finance organization in Kenya where he subsequently started 3DLP initially as a Social Enterprise in order to provide sustainable, affordable, and suitable 3D printed prosthetics for the developing world amputees. He currently overseas 3DLP’s European operations from Barcelona that provide a variety of innovative medical 3D printing products and services to medical institutions.

Careers Panel Discussion

Two

Day:

12:00-13:00 GMT

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Mark Inglis

Mountaineer, Researcher, Winemaker and Motivational Speaker

Mark Inglis Unlimited

Between‌ ‌losing‌ ‌his‌ ‌legs‌ ‌at‌ ‌23‌ ‌years‌ ‌old‌ ‌due‌ ‌to‌ ‌frostbite‌ ‌and‌ ‌then‌ ‌going‌ ‌on‌ ‌to‌ ‌be‌ ‌the‌ ‌first‌ ‌(and‌ ‌until‌ ‌recently‌ ‌the‌ ‌only)‌ ‌double‌ ‌amputee‌ ‌to‌ ‌have‌ ‌stood‌ ‌on‌ ‌the‌ ‌roof‌ ‌of‌ ‌the‌ ‌world,‌ ‌the‌ ‌summit‌ ‌of‌ ‌Mount‌ ‌Everest.‌ ‌Mark‌ ‌has‌ ‌carved‌ ‌out‌ ‌careers‌ ‌as‌ ‌a‌ ‌scientist,‌ ‌a‌ ‌world‌ ‌recognised‌ ‌winemaker,‌ ‌business‌ ‌innovator,‌ ‌paralympic‌ ‌athlete,‌ ‌trekking‌ ‌guide,‌ ‌philanthropist‌ ‌and‌ ‌a‌ ‌leading‌ ‌International‌ ‌Motivator.‌ ‌Who‌ ‌else‌ ‌can‌ ‌truly‌ ‌define‌ ‌the‌ ‌often‌ ‌used‌ ‌saying,‌ ‌‌“Attitude‌ ‌determines‌ ‌your‌ ‌Altitude”.‌ ‌His‌ ‌many‌ ‌achievements‌ ‌include‌ ‌

●First‌ ‌and‌ ‌only‌ ‌double‌ ‌amputee‌ ‌to‌ ‌summit‌ ‌Mount‌ ‌Everest‌ ‌(15‌ ‌May‌ ‌2006).‌ ‌
●NZ‌ ‌1st‌ ‌Paralympic‌ ‌Cycling‌ ‌Medal‌ ‌–‌ ‌Silver,‌ ‌Sydney‌ ‌2000‌ ‌
●Doctor‌ ‌of‌ ‌Natural‌ ‌Resources,‌ ‌honoris‌ ‌causa‌ ‌
●Officer‌ ‌of‌ ‌the‌ ‌NZ‌ ‌Order‌ ‌of‌ ‌Merit‌ ‌(ONZM)‌ ‌
●A‌ ‌Bachelor‌ ‌of‌ ‌Science,‌ ‌1st‌ ‌Class‌ ‌Honours,‌ ‌Human‌ ‌Biochemistry‌ ‌
●Founding‌ ‌Trustee‌ ‌of‌ ‌Limbs4All‌ ‌Charitable‌ ‌Trust‌ ‌
●Patron‌ ‌of‌ ‌Cambodia‌ ‌Trust‌ ‌NZ,‌ ‌NZ/Nepalese‌ ‌Foundation‌ ‌
●Internationally‌ ‌awarded‌ ‌winemaker‌ ‌for‌ ‌over‌ ‌18‌ ‌years‌ ‌
●Ambassador‌ ‌for‌ ‌ScoutsNZ‌ ‌and‌ ‌Outward‌ ‌Bound‌ ‌

The Accidental Traveller

Two

Day:

09:00 - 10:00 GMT

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Sisary Kheng

PhD Research

University of Salford

Sisary Kheng has been involved with prosthetic and orthotic service in Cambodia since her graduation from the Cambodian School of Prosthetics and Orthotics (CSPO) in 2000. She has been involved in PO education in 2001 and has been contributing to the enhancement of quality education, regional collaboration and ISPO since 2003. Within her dual roles as the Director of CSPO (from 2010) and the Country Director of Exceed Worldwide-Cambodia (from 2012), Sisary has been leading up the Strategic Management Team and the programmes of the three physical rehabilitated centers, Community Development Programme, and international training programme at CSP as well as Higher Education Scholarships for Youth with Disabilities. The vision of Exceed’s project is to equip, enable, empower social inclusion through empowerment of people with disabilities to be better involved in social change and sustainable development. She also spearheads the latest development at Exceed is the Social Enterprise for sustainability where Exceed foresees the future with a changing business model. The initiative offers a full range of high and low level technologies to those who can afford to pay, the income generated to be fed back into the system to subsidise and support services for those who can least afford it and for our educational and community based activities. Her expertise are in partnership development, strategic thinking, diplomacy, sustainability approach, long term relationships, investment in people and most of all, great understanding of local needs, local cultural context and challenges. Currently, she is a student from the first cohort of CDT in Prosthetics and Orthotics at the University of Salford.

Cambodia Limb Project

Two

Day:

11:15 - 11:45 GMT

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Dr Cheryl Metcalf

Principal Enterprise Fellow

University of Southampton

Dr Cheryl Metcalf is an expert in innovation in health systems and technology, specifically sustainable innovation in health systems. She held a prestigious RCUK Roberts Fellowship in Life Sciences Interfaces (2008-2011). Her research has evolved from understanding the biomechanical mechanisms underpinning prosthetic design, to understanding how health systems can and do support the people they serve, whether implementing new technological solutions to increase access, or by optimising parts of the service working alongside stakeholders. With her diverse background spanning computer science, health sciences and experience in Knowledge Exchange, she has developed a unique set of tools to work with stakeholders to understand their needs and support change embedded in values perceived by users and influencers of the health system. She focuses particularly on working in a sustainable way with project partners; always mindful that project research funding is transitory, and uses her experience in value-led design thinking and methods traditionally developed for business planning, to engage stakeholders to work toward transformative, innovative and sustainable health systems and technology solutions. Much of this work is within the amputation rehabilitation, prosthetics and mobility sectors, and spans UK and Lower- Middle-Income Country contexts.

Cambodia Limb Project

Two

Day:

11:15 - 11:45 GMT

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Elaine Owen, MBE MSc SRP MCSP

Clinical Specialist Physiotherapist

Elaine has worked clinically in the NHS for over 40 years, working with childhood onset disabilities and adult neurology. She has extensive post-graduate training, including diplomas in Lower limb Orthotic Biomechanics and Clinical Gait Analysis. She has combined physiotherapy and biomechanics knowledge to develop clinical algorithms and new rehabilitation strategies. She has peer reviewed publications and has won several UK and international awards. She is regularly invited to teach her course ‘Gait Analysis and Orthotic Management, an Optimal Segmental Kinematics and Alignment approach to Rehabilitation (OSKAR)’ and presents at international conferences, including AACPDM, AAOP, ESMAC & ISPO.

Careers Panel Discussion

Two

Day:

12:00-13:00 GMT

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Dr Alex Dickinson

Associate Professor

University of Southampton

Dr Alex Dickinson is an Associate Professor at the Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Southampton, UK. He held a Research Fellowship from the Royal Academy of Engineering (2015-20) and built a team working on data technologies to enhance the design and assessment of prosthetic limbs. Trying to improve our understanding of prosthetic socket design, their research involves computational modelling of the residual limb-socket interface, and collection of medical imaging and biophysical data to evaluate the effects of prosthesis-induced mechanical loads upon the residual limb soft tissues. He leads a Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) project with partners at Exceed Worldwide (Cambodia) and the University of Salford investigating how digital assessment and design technologies might help enhance access to P&O services in low-resourced settings.

Cambodia Limb Project

Two

Day:

11:15 - 11:45 GMT

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Dr. Stefania Fatone, PhD, BPO(Hons)

Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Dr. Stefania Fatone is a Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois, USA. She completed her undergraduate degree in prosthetics and orthotics and her doctoral studies at La Trobe University in Australia. Dr. Fatone has over 20 years of experience conducting prosthetics and orthotics research and currently leads multiple research projects funded by federal agencies and professional organizations. She also contributes to the Masters in Prosthetics and Orthotics program at the Northwestern University Prosthetics-Orthotics Center (NUPOC). Her research includes a broad range of experimental, qualitative, and review studies in areas such as transfemoral prosthetic socket biomechanics and design, orthotic management of upper motor neuron lesions, and partial foot amputation. She has published more than 80 journal articles, book chapters, editorials, commentaries, and evidence notes and presents regularly at conferences nationally and internationally. Dr. Fatone is an honorary Member of the American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists and a recipient of the Academy’s distinguished Research Award. She is also recently completed a two year term as co-Editor-in-Chief of Prosthetics and Orthotics International.

The Northwestern University Flexible Sub-Ischial Socket Technique: Development, Research, and Dissemination

One

Day:

18:15 - 18:45 GMT

This presentation will describe our efforts to develop a more comfortable sub-ischial socket for persons with transfemoral amputation. It will provide an overview of development, research and dissemination of the Northwestern University Flexible Sub-Ischial Socket technique. The technique provides for both vacuum (NU-FlexSIV) and suction (NU-FlexSIS) versions of the socket.

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Professor Catherine Holloway

Co-founder, Academic Director of GDI Hub and Professor

UCL’s Interaction Centre

Cathy is a creative leader who looks to expand the role and relevance of academia through her research, teaching, engagement and innovation activities. She is pioneering the Disability Interaction framework to help accelerate disability innovation for a fairer world. This work spans the domains of human-computer interaction, accessibility and assistive technology and policy.
Cathy’s research portfolio includes the development of new prosthetics for both the UK and lower income countries; the use of the Internet of Things to automate the creation of city-level accessibility maps for wheelchair users in Delhi and London; and the development of inclusive innovation methods. All of Cathy’s work has an ethos of co-development.
Cathy has published over 80 peer-reviewed papers and is co-PI of the AT2030 programme. Cathy is a member of the Expert Advisory Group for the World Health Organization WHO’s Word Report on Assistive Technology and sits on the EPSRC, Healthcare Technologies SAT where she is also the Big Ideas Champion.
Cathy previously delivered the concept of (and ran four-years) the highly-successful James Dyson Foundation Summer School-UCL wheelchair hacking summer schoo
Prior to joining UCL Cathy worked as a Research and Development Engineer for Medtronic. She is a former Japan Society for the Promotion of Science fellow, and has delivered a range of keynotes and discussion pieces including to the British Council in Tokyo, the World Health Organisation and at the Paralympics in Rio. Cathy is also a Director and co-founder of two social enterprises – Movement Metrics and the GDI Hub Community Interest Company.

Global Challenges facing P&O and Careers Panel Discussion

Two

Day:

10:15 - 10:45 GMT and 12:00-13:00 GMT

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Professor Laurence Kenney

Professor in Rehabilitation Technologies

University of Salford

Laurence Kenney originally trained in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Salford. Since the late 1990s his research has focused on the design of devices to assist limb function, together with novel tools with which to evaluate them. He has published 75 journal papers and is a past Associate Editor of Prosthetics and Orthotics International. He currently leads the Fit-for-purpose upper limb prosthetics project, and an NIHR-funded project to improve myoelectric control with Newcastle and Edinburgh Universities, and prosthetics company, Covvi.

Fit-for-purpose upper limb prosthetics

Two

Day:

10:45 - 11:15 GMT

The talk will give an overview of an EPSRC/NIHR Global Challenges Research Fund project involving teams in Uganda, Jordan and the UK. The project aims to develop low-cost, purely mechanical prostheses, together with tools for their evaluation. I will begin with an overview of the context within which our designs might sit, emphasising the importance of not only understanding the perspectives of users and clinicians, but also looking at the broader context including supply chains and clinical infrastructure. I’ll then illustrate some of the ways in which we have tried to address these issues in our project.

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Professor Peter Lee

Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Deputy Head of Department for Research; Director

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Melbourne School of Engineering, University of Melbourne; Australian Research Council Training Centre for Medical Implant Technologies

Professor Peter Lee is a Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Melbourne. He is also the Deputy Head of Department for Research.

Prof. Lee’s research interests lie in rehabilitation engineering and biomechanics of the human body. His research contributes to a wide range of interdisciplinary fields in biomedical engineering, including biomaterials, medical devices and rehabilitation engineering.

He specialises in musculoskeletal biomechanics and he been actively working in the area of low–cost artificial limbs using a portable and easy-to-use prosthetic socket fitting system.

Prof. Lee obtained his Bachelor of Engineering in Mechanical Engineering and PhD in Bioengineering from the University of Strathclyde, UK, where he continued his postdoctoral studies. Prior to joining the University of Melbourne, Professor Lee held several senior positions in Singapore including the:

Singapore Institute of Materials Research and Engineering;

Singapore Defence Medical and Environmental Research Institute; and

National University of Singapore, Division of Bioengineering.

Prof. Lee is the Director of the Australian Research Council (ARC) Training Centre for Medical Implant Technologies and the Chief Investigator in the ARC Training Centre for Personalised Therapeutic Technologies. He is currently the Associate Editor for Medicine in Novel Technology and Devices (Elsevier), Frontiers in Pharmacology, Translational Pharmacology (Frontiers), and Deputy Editor for Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research (Springer Nature).

Prof. Lee's laboratory has made significant impact in applying interdisciplinary and multi-scaled solutions for complex biomedical problem, taking research through the full value chain from design, clinical trials to commercialization.

Prof. Lee’s team developed the titanium 3D-printed Melbourne Temporal Mandibular Joint prosthesis, using comprehensive biomechanical measurements to build computational models to represent the underlying physiology of the human jaw when actual measurements could not be obtained directly from patients. The titanium prosthesis was commercialised by the start-up company, OMX Solutions Pty Ltd in 2015 and has been fitted into more than 100 patients since.

As Director of the ARC Training Centre for Medical Implant Technologies he leads the largest industry-university-hospital partnership in Australia focusing on orthopaedic and maxillofacial implants to train a new generation of interdisciplinary engineers in biomechanics, materials and manufacturing for the orthopaedic and maxillofacial implant industry.

Careers Panel Discussion

Two

Day:

12:00-13:00 GMT

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Dr. Kia Nazarpour

Reader in Biomedical Artificial Intelligence

School of Informatics, The University of Edinburgh

Kia Nazarpour is a Reader in Biomedical Artificial Intelligence at School of Informatics, The University of Edinburgh. Previously, he was a Senior Algorithm Engineer at Touch Bionics. His research is motivated by the potential of technology to restore function and independence to individuals with disability. He currently leads a team of six research associates, of whom two work exclusively on the co-creation and user-centred design of next-generation assistive technologies. Dr Nazarpour has received circa £8M funding from various sources and currently has active projects funded by EPSRC, NIHR, EU H2020, and ESRC. His work has received many awards, including the UNESCO Netexplo 2018 award with citation “one of the most promising digital innovations with impact on society and business”.

The case for and against pattern recognition for myoelectric control

One

Day:

17:45 - 18:15 GMT

Since the 1970’s, machine learning has been studied to enhance the control of myoelectric prostheses. In this machine-centred approach, the user’s movement intent is decoded using a trained algorithm; aiming an intuitive control of the prosthesis. Some commercial products adopt this approach. However, clinical translation has been limited because: 1) evidence supporting the intuitiveness of control is missing; 2) many users cannot generate distinct EMG patterns of grips in a repeatable way; 3) outside of clinics, frequent recalibration may be required to counteract the effect of electrode displacement and the movement of the residual limb; and finally, 4) clinical adoption requires significant staff training.

The knowledge in the nervous system about the properties of the body and its movement in the external world is called an internal model. Practice drives the development of new internal models of prosthesis control or adaptation of an existing ones. In this talk I introduce Abstract Decoding as an example of a human-centred approach for prosthesis control and discuss its strengths and pitfalls.

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Claude Tardiff

President

International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics (ISPO)

Claude Tardif is a prosthetist-orthotist by profession, and work as an international consultant on rehabilitation and assistive technology. He is the current President of the International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics (ISPO).

After a clinical and academic career in Canada, he started to work in the humanitarian field in 1998 and joined the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in 2002. Between 2004 and 2016, he was the Head of ICRC Physical Rehabilitation Programme.

He is a board member of the International Society for Wheelchair Professionals (ISWP), an advisor to the African Federation of Rehabilitation Professionals (FATO), and a member of the World Health Organization (WHO) Ad-Hoc Advisory Group of Experts on Assistive Technology.

Prosthetics and Orthotics in an evolving world

One

Day:

15:15 - 16:15 GMT

In the future, the number of people requiring prosthetics and orthotics services is bound to rise because both the world’s population and life expectancy are growing. In many countries, and not only in low and middle-income countries, only 5–15% of the people who could benefit from assistive products have access to them, including prostheses and orthoses. Barriers hampering access to prosthetic and orthotic services are numerous and the biggest challenge, in the future, facing the prosthetics and orthotics ecosystem is how to address these barriers to ensure that a greater number of peoples have access to appropriate and quality of services.